The Adhoc-racy and the Rule of Law in the 2008 Financial Crisis

When surveying the vast wreckage of the 2008 financial crisis, many classical liberals worry that the most profound damage done was to the rule of law in America.  Though it is difficult to pin down the concept with great precision, the core of the rule of law is simple: we have a government of laws,…

After Indiana: Harmonizing Gay Rights and Religious Freedom

After the furor directed at Indiana for enacting a religious freedom measure, some are asking whether it is possible to…

The Philosophy of Governance in Game of Thrones

The HBO television show Game of Thrones, based on the books by George R. R. Martin, has begun its fifth…

From the Blog

Mike Rappaport
University of San Diego School of Law

The Philosophy of Governance in Game of Thrones

The HBO television show Game of Thrones, based on the books by George R. R.…

Why Do Some on the Left Believe in Income Equality?

In my last post, I discussed why one should care about economic mobility for the…

Income Equality and Economic Mobility

In his most recent New York Times column, Tyler Cowen writes about two competing goals…

John O. McGinnis
Northwestern University School of Law

The New Architecture of Legal Education

The recent  architectural addition to Northwestern Law School where I teach – a lovely, three-floor, glass-clad space…

Is It Time to Sell Google?

Yesterday The European Union sued Google under its competition law. This lawsuit shows either that…

Executive Power Should be an Important Issue in the Presidential Campaign

In his second term, President Obama has unilaterally pressed his agenda, now that he has…

Michael S. Greve
George Mason School of Law

Nationalize It

In this Liberty Law Talk with James L. Buckley—Judge, Senator, Saint—he proposed to terminate any and all…

Where Have All the Start-Ups Gone?

Robert Samuelson, in his columns for the Washington Post, has done wonders in explaining stuff…

Deferred Action for Federal Government Accountability

DAPA—short for the clunky “Deferred Action for Parental Accountability,” or maybe “Parents of Americans” (I’ve…

Liberty Law Forum

lawlibrary

Reasons to Be Cheerful: The Future of Legal Education

This is a time of turmoil in legal education, and, to a large extent, in higher education generally. Enrollment in U.S. law schools has dropped to 1974 levels, yet there are more than fifty additional law schools now. Enrollments have fallen even at highly regarded schools, as illustrated by the announcement from Washington and Lee…

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Responses

Reasons to Be Gloomy About Legal Education

I agree with much in Dean Andrew Morriss’ Liberty Forum essay. And I endorse his hope that, in the future, legal academia will have greater differentiation. Yet my take on legal education’s prospects is much gloomier. Dean Morriss writes mostly about what should occur going forward, whereas I am watching what is happening right now.…

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The Non-Virtuous Circle

Dean Morriss’ essay, “Reasons to Be Cheerful: The Future of Legal Education,” is a welcome addition to the growing literature on what the present and future hold for law schools. He rightly emphasizes the role of competition and the need for greater diversity. And the stakeholders at Texas A&M University School of Law are indeed…

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The “Blue Ocean” for Law Schools

During the five years of the decline in JD applications, law schools have moved from self-defense to increased innovation and even restructuring. Within this emerging paradigm, Andy Morriss’ Liberty Forum essay offers some reason for optimism. Originally, when JD applications shrank and criticism grew, and the JD job market declined, law schools defended their traditional student-value…

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