Of Public Sector Millionaires

Life is a long succession of vested interests, though we are inclined to see everyone’s but our own. The term now having mainly a negative connotation, we usually think of some interests—namely those of a pecuniary nature—as being more vested than others. A money-interest is widely thought to be more corrupting than any other. If…

Ramsey and Tillman on the Receive Ambassadors Clause

Over at the Originalism Blog, Mike Ramsey and Seth Barrett Tillman have been debating whether House Speaker John Boehner’s invitation…

Obama’s Nod to Crony Philanthropy

In his January 21 column for Forbes (“Obama's SOTU Surprise: A Break for Charity”) Manhattan Institute Vice President Howard Husock speculates…

From the Blog

Mike Rappaport
University of San Diego School of Law

Ramsey and Tillman on the Receive Ambassadors Clause

Over at the Originalism Blog, Mike Ramsey and Seth Barrett Tillman have been debating whether…

More on Bias in the Implementation of Sexual Assault Laws

Via Eugene Volokh, I came upon this article in the American Prospect by feminist advocate…

The Declaration of Independence and the U.S. Constitution

What is the relationship between these documents, especially for interpreting the Constitution?  There are several…

John O. McGinnis
Northwestern University School of Law

Unfunded Future Forgiveness

This weekend The New York Times presented an article about the current structure of student…

Our Hereditary Candidates and Campaign Finance Regulation

It is remarkable that four of the leading likely candidates to become the next President…

Another Step Toward Neutral Principles in Campaign Regulation

This week the Supreme Court heard argument in Williams-Yulee v. The Florida Bar. The case…

Michael S. Greve
George Mason School of Law

Eggstraterrritorial Federalism

The Wall Street Journal, among other news outlets, reports that egg prices in California have…

DOJ’s Reply Brief in King: They’re under Water and They Know It

I haven’t had much time to parse the government’s reply brief in King v. Burwell.…

Reforming the Administrative State Is a Game of Inches

The oral argument transcript in Armstrong v. Exceptional Child Center—subject of my preceding post —is…

Liberty Law Forum

Gregory Peck Dies at 87

Where Did the Noble Lawyer Go?: Looking for Cicero in the Boardroom or on the Billboard

Marcus Tullius Cicero, born to a little-known family of Rome’s minor nobility, rose to become the Republic’s great defender, chief conciliator, and enduring interpreter of its laws. His murder for opposing the tyranny of Mark Antony and Octavian, or Caesar Augustus, and the clarity of his writings on the law and republican ideals of Rome…

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Responses

Teaching the Law’s Moral Purposes

I am an admirer of Steve Sheppard and of his scholarship. His book on the ethical obligations of lawyers is not just as a reminder of the necessity for lawyers to comply with lawyerly standards. More than formal compliance with the canons of ethics is needed today.[1] Serious consideration of the true moral purposes of…

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Wherefore Art Thou Cicero?

With “Where did the Noble Lawyer Go?: Looking for Cicero in the Boardroom and on the Billboard,” Professor Stephen Sheppard has provided us with a provocative, as one expects from the editor of the three-volume Selected Works of Sir Edward Coke,[1] rumination on the decline of the legal profession. He contrasts the lawyer of today…

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Cicero, Demythologized and Disenchanted, and Still a Voice Worth Heeding

I am fascinated with Stephen Sheppard's essay on Cicero and the modern American lawyer.  In a sense, he is calling me back to those ideals I held so dear as an entering one-L a long time ago. Cicero, it is not too strong to say this, is one of the reasons I went to law school.…

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