Bolivar with a Burr

The words that Lord Falkland is supposed to have said—that when it is not necessary to change, it is necessary not to change—is a lesson that humanity and above all politicians are reluctant to learn. There’s no profit in it for “projectors,” Edmund Burke’s term for those who place at the center of their own sense…

Telling the Truth about Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn

Comes now the great Daniel J. Mahoney, author of penetrating intellectual biographies of Bertrand de Jouvenel, Raymond Aron, and Charles…

Freedom of the Church

I am grateful to the Liberty Law Forum for publishing my short essay, Freedom of Religion and the Freedom of…

From the Blog

Mike Rappaport
University of San Diego School of Law

Reinvigorating the Nondelegation Doctrine through the Constitutional Amendment Process

One of the ways that small government and democratic accountability could be promoted in the…

The Reclining Controversy

When I first heard about the “Knee Defender,” I was really outraged.  The idea that…

Hayek on the Rechtsstaat

Michael Greve has a great post on the German origins of progressive Administration Law in the…

John O. McGinnis
Northwestern University School of Law

The Scottish Earthquake

The  effects of the vote on Scottish Independence, like the French Revolution, will not be…

Seizing the Opportunity to Revisit the Republic’s First Principles

On Monday Senator Harry Reid introduced an amendment, which would permit both Congress and state…

The Silver Lining of a Very Bad Proposed Amendment

This week, Senate majority leader Harry Reid will bring to the floor an amendment to…

Michael S. Greve
George Mason School of Law

Halbig: Another Expert View

The federal judiciary is in great need of expert economic advice, and mercifully some are…

Federalism, Yet Again: Views From the Citadel

Last Fall, the excellent Jim Fleming (Boston University Law School) organized a fun conference on…

The German Connection, Part II: Of Law and Citizens

My earlier post suggested that there might be something to learn from the liberal version…

Liberty Law Forum

U.S. Soldiers at Camp Bucca in Iraq. Photo Credit: DAVID FURST/AFP/Getty Images

How to Secure America’s Peace

Our historically literate founding statesmen elaborated a foreign policy to shield Americans’ exceptional way of life in a hostile world through the timeless principles of statecraft. For more than a century, their successors held to the Founders’ purpose and to those principles. America grew great. Since the beginning of the 20th century, however, a new…

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Responses

Finding Fault in Our National Insecurity

Angelo Codevilla has been a legend in our house since the 1980s when my wife and I first encountered this Renaissance force of nature radiating virtú. Somehow Angelo manages a vineyard in California, a horse ranch in Wyoming, a large, loving family, a prolific academic career, and world travel without strain, indeed with unfailing ebullience.…

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A Trenchant Yet Flawed Analysis of American Foreign Policy

Angelo Codevilla’s analysis of the many problems associated with U.S. foreign policy provides an abundance of important insights. He is devastatingly on the mark when he contends that since the beginning of the 20th century, U.S. officials have transformed the Founders’ emphasis on shielding the American people against external dangers into an arrogant, unattainable objective…

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