The Preeminence of Prudence

Washington forgives many things, from Oval Office indiscretions to executive abuses. But neither laughter nor defeat makes the pardonable cut, and George H.W. Bush has endured both, in each case for precisely the quality that most commends him: prudence. It has consequently taken more than two decades since his departure from the White House in 1993,…

Another Step Toward Neutral Principles in Campaign Regulation

This week the Supreme Court heard argument in Williams-Yulee v. The Florida Bar. The case is the sixth campaign finance…

More on Bias in the Implementation of Sexual Assault Laws

Via Eugene Volokh, I came upon this article in the American Prospect by feminist advocate and retired federal judge Nancy…

From the Blog

Mike Rappaport
University of San Diego School of Law

More on Bias in the Implementation of Sexual Assault Laws

Via Eugene Volokh, I came upon this article in the American Prospect by feminist advocate…

The Declaration of Independence and the U.S. Constitution

What is the relationship between these documents, especially for interpreting the Constitution?  There are several…

More on Extremist and Moderate Muslims

The comments on my prior post on extremist and moderate Muslims led me to believe that more…

John O. McGinnis
Northwestern University School of Law

Another Step Toward Neutral Principles in Campaign Regulation

This week the Supreme Court heard argument in Williams-Yulee v. The Florida Bar. The case…

Old Complaints about New Technology

In this Sunday’s New York Times Book Review Leon Wieseltier has polemicized against the digital…

Tradition, Technology, and Change in Downton Abbey

Many critics have chalked up the craze for Downton Abbey to nostalgia for a time…

Michael S. Greve
George Mason School of Law

DOJ’s Reply Brief in King: They’re under Water and They Know It

I haven’t had much time to parse the government’s reply brief in King v. Burwell.…

Reforming the Administrative State Is a Game of Inches

The oral argument transcript in Armstrong v. Exceptional Child Center—subject of my preceding post —is…

Chamber of Commerce Defends Rentseekers United

Today (Tuesday, January 20) the Supreme Court is hearing arguments in Armstrong v. Exceptional Child…

Liberty Law Forum

Gregory Peck Dies at 87

Where Did the Noble Lawyer Go?: Looking for Cicero in the Boardroom or on the Billboard

Marcus Tullius Cicero, born to a little-known family of Rome’s minor nobility, rose to become the Republic’s great defender, chief conciliator, and enduring interpreter of its laws. His murder for opposing the tyranny of Mark Antony and Octavian, or Caesar Augustus, and the clarity of his writings on the law and republican ideals of Rome…

Read More

Responses

Teaching the Law’s Moral Purposes

I am an admirer of Steve Sheppard and of his scholarship. His book on the ethical obligations of lawyers is not just as a reminder of the necessity for lawyers to comply with lawyerly standards. More than formal compliance with the canons of ethics is needed today.[1] Serious consideration of the true moral purposes of…

Read More

Wherefore Art Thou Cicero?

With “Where did the Noble Lawyer Go?: Looking for Cicero in the Boardroom and on the Billboard,” Professor Stephen Sheppard has provided us with a provocative, as one expects from the editor of the three-volume Selected Works of Sir Edward Coke,[1] rumination on the decline of the legal profession. He contrasts the lawyer of today…

Read More

Cicero, Demythologized and Disenchanted, and Still a Voice Worth Heeding

I am fascinated with Stephen Sheppard's essay on Cicero and the modern American lawyer.  In a sense, he is calling me back to those ideals I held so dear as an entering one-L a long time ago. Cicero, it is not too strong to say this, is one of the reasons I went to law school.…

Read More