We Grow More Equal as Technology Dematerializes the World

At this year's Federalist Society student symposium Richard Epstein and I spoke on a panel on Innovation and Inequality.  We agreed that the innovation created by capitalism has hugely benefited the poorest in society.  We disagreed over the extent to which the very nature of modern innovation itself has a tempering effect on inequality. In my view,…

Federal Preemption: The Numbers

The federal preemption of state law is a subject that only dorks could love. Four of them (Jon Klick, Mike…

Article III’s Case-or-Controversy Requirement: The Original Meaning

Another of the papers held at the Works-in-Progress Conference at the Originalism Center at the University of San Diego this…

From the Blog

Mike Rappaport
University of San Diego School of Law

Article III’s Case-or-Controversy Requirement: The Original Meaning

Another of the papers held at the Works-in-Progress Conference at the Originalism Center at the…

The German and Dutch Founding-Era Translations of the Constitution

This past weekend, the Center for the Study of Constitutional Originalism at the University of…

Reacting to Lincoln

In my previous post, I wrote about a talk that I had recently given about…

John O. McGinnis
Northwestern University School of Law

We Grow More Equal as Technology Dematerializes the World

At this year's Federalist Society student symposium Richard Epstein and I spoke on a panel on…

Burke, Historical Experience, and Change

At the Federalist Society national student symposium, my colleague Josh Kleinfeld was the deserving recipient…

Share–and Care–Alike

In the sharing economy, companies like Uber, Lyft, and Airbnb, add value by using resources…

Michael S. Greve
George Mason School of Law

Federal Preemption: The Numbers

The federal preemption of state law is a subject that only dorks could love. Four…

Flowers and Headscarves, Oh My!

Have you heard the one about the Christian florist who declined to sell flowers for…

Illinois Looks for a Life Raft

Chapter 9 of the U.S. Bankruptcy Code governs bankruptcy proceedings for municipal governments (but not…

Liberty Law Forum

anglosphere

The Anglosphere: A Viable Global Actor or Simply a Culture?

Given that I am of Scottish and English descent, grew up in Australia, did my doctorate in Britain, and now live and work in America, I am about as much a product of what is often called “the Anglosphere” as it gets. That such a sphere exists, culturally speaking, has never seemed in doubt to…

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Responses

The Yanks Made Us Do It

The central question addressed by Samuel Gregg in his timely ruminations about the Anglosphere is how ready and willing its member nations are to “collectively shape the global order” through collaboration beyond that in which they already engage. His chief contention is that, while the nations of the Anglosphere jointly possess the necessary economic, demographic,…

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Snubbing the Anglosphere

Samuel Gregg rightly concludes that the political cooperation required for the nations of “the Anglosphere” to act as an effective international bloc rests upon choices by leaders. Cultural ties and longstanding security relationships open possibilities, but pursuing them requires conscious decision. To elaborate on Gregg’s analysis, one would have to consider what presuppositions and concerns…

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Crisis of Identity: Here, There, and in the Canuckosphere

Samuel Gregg’s thoughtful Liberty Forum essay on the prospects for a functional “Anglosphere” leaves me perplexed. He is no Pollyanna on the matter, but to my mind he underestimates some monumental intellectual and practical difficulties confronting statesmen who would try to move the English-speaking peoples from ad hoc cooperation in various areas, animated by real…

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