Arms and the Several States

My last post discussed how John Paul Stevens, late of the Supreme Court, and author Michael Waldman advance a stingy, substantively empty view of the Second Amendment by ignoring the Constitution’s framework of limited, enumerated powers. That critique, of course, only goes to federal authority. The right to arms enforceable against the states rests on…

Town of Greece: Springtime for Atheists—and Us All

In May some of us were waiting, with apprehension and hope, for the outcome in the Hobby Lobby case; but…

The Politics of Moral Outrage

Moral outrage, when it is not fatuous, is politically potent. Vivid examples of politicians and commentators in full-throated, red-faced attacks…

From the Blog

Mike Rappaport
University of San Diego

Invasion of Iraq: The Obama Administration’s Failure to Check al-Maliki

I have been in the process of describing the evolution of my views on the…

The Invasion of Iraq: The Bush Administration’s Incompetence Reduces the Benefits

In my last post, I wrote a bit about my changing views on foreign policy…

The Invasion of Iraq: A Change in My Position

In a series of posts, I hope to explain why I made a mistake by…

John O. McGinnis
Northwestern University

Real Campaign Finance Reform: Legislating Through General Rules.

In a series of decisions on campaign finance legislation, the Roberts Court has made it…

A Focus Group on Originalism

These are the best of times and the worst of times for originalism. On the…

A Star is Torn

In the Energy Star Program, the Energy Department rates energy-efficient and otherwise green appliances. The…

Steven D. Smith
University of San Diego

Political Decisions Must Be “Secular”? Since When?

Hovering like a stern schoolmarm over much of our political discourse and decision-making is a…

Democracy in Decline: The Book and the Blurb

This post is a book notice with a twist. The book is Democracy in Decline: Steps…

The Deflation of Rights

Print up a bunch of money, and the value of money is almost sure to decline.…

Liberty Law Forum

corporatism

The Rise of Adversarial Corporatism

Timothy F. Geithner, former U.S. Secretary of the Treasury and savior of the free world,[1] has lamented the intractable paradox of financial crises: government must lend freely to actors who by all rights should bear the price of their own reckless conduct and be wiped out. The post-crisis years have been marked by a related…

Read More

Responses

The New Cronyism of the Old Rent-Seeking State

Michael Greve’s essay vividly describes some deeply troubling trends in the relationship between the government and the economy. It provides a much needed perspective at a time when politics and policy-making are nothing if not adversarial, and more casual observers succumb to the temptation simply to choose sides without asking how we came to this…

Read More

Does a Sophisticated Theory Miss the Facts?

Michael Greve introduces “adversarial corporatism,” a new conceptual lens through which to view the growing and contentious collaboration of industry and government. Adversarial corporatism takes the conventional story of crony capitalism and regulatory capture—a story appealing to critics on the left and the right alike—and adds a dose of a starker reality: the cooperation is…

Read More

Adversarial Corporatism: Additional Thoughts

I am deeply grateful to Brian Mannix and to Peter Conti-Brown for their thoughtful, indeed profound comments on my “adversarial corporatism” post. I am equally grateful to Richard Reinsch and the Liberty Forum for hosting this exchange. To paraphrase the Boss, we learn more from three minutes on this blog than we ever learned in…

Read More