Why Iraqi Chemical Weapons Embarrass the U.S. Government

The New York Times’ account of Washington’s embarrassed secrecy about the U.S. military’s encounter with several thousand chemical weapons in Iraq, and the often callous medical treatment provided to the troops who dealt with them during the 2003-20011 occupation, is incomplete. Not mentioned by the Times is that our special operations forces had run into these…

The Problem of Nonlegislative Rules

One of the big problems involving administrative agencies is that they are often insufficiently checked.  With the relaxation of separation…

Your Credit History (the Accurate Version)

The story is a familiar one: Irresponsible consumers and rapacious borrowers collide in a frenzy of consumption that takes down…

From the Blog

Mike Rappaport
University of San Diego School of Law

The Problem of Nonlegislative Rules

One of the big problems involving administrative agencies is that they are often insufficiently checked. …

Two Political Theory Courses

As I have mentioned before, I am a big fan of listening to college courses…

Mario Rizzo on Classical Liberals and Libertarians

My old friend Mario Rizzo has a great post up on classical liberalism and libertarianism.  The…

John O. McGinnis
Northwestern University School of Law

Same-Sex Marriage, the Political Process and Judicial Manipulation

There is a new meme circulating among journalists about the Supreme Court’s decision not to…

Eliminate Missouri Plans for Judicial Selection

It is election season again. And that means it is time for complaining about electoral…

The Rise of Machine Intelligence and the Need for Judicial Protection of Occupational Freedom

Occupational freedom is one of the most pressing issues of our time.   The ever greater…

Michael S. Greve
George Mason School of Law

The Taxman Cometh, Twice

Among the cases teed up for the Supreme Court’s current Term is Comptroller v. Wynne,…

Tyranny on the Margin

I’m grateful for the responses to my earlier Office for Civil Rights post, especially the…

Prescription for a Banana Republic

This past Friday, Boston College’s excellent Shep Melnick (interviewed on this site not long ago)…

Liberty Law Forum

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Can America Remain a Nation of Immigrants in the 21st Century?

We often call ours “a nation of immigrants.” It is a peculiar and paradoxical phrase. A “nation,” as generally understood, is a tribal, ethnic, or historical group. In the era of the American Revolution, a nation, a people, a tribe, and a race were often interchangeable terms. Nation, as the word is usually used by…

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Responses

Immigration Bolsters American Freedom

There is much to agree with in Richard Samuelson’s essay. My disagreement arises from three main sources. First, Samuelson undervalues how important relatively freer immigration is for maintaining American values and institutions. Second, his view of the country’s past assimilation of immigrants is too rosy. Third, his pessimism concerning the assimilation of current immigrants is…

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The Past, Present, and Future of American Immigration

Richard Samuelson has provided us with a thoughtful discussion of immigration in modern America, focusing on its philosophical meanings and its place in American society. He defends the idea of America as a “credal” nation built upon the political principles of the Founding era and sees the assimilation of immigrants to that Founding creed as…

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Assimilation is a Brutal and Necessary Bargain

Let me begin by acknowledging that I share Professor Samuelson’s concern that many immigrants today are not assimilating to “classic American values of thrift, hard work, and cooperation in civil society.” I, too, am uneasy at the prospect of immigrants being influenced by “trans-national” elites to the point where they, and especially their children, may…

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