Veterans Cemetery

Blessed Memorial Day

Uwe E. Reinhardt is a celebrity prof (economics and public affairs) at Princeton. I’ve never met him but have read some of his stuff, on account of my passing interest in health care economics. I can’t judge it but it’s consistently informative, and leavened with a healthy sense that “we economists really do not know…

Judicial Restraint is a Question of Constitutional Interpretation

 Greg Weiner and Evan Bernick have been conducting an interesting debate in this blog about the virtues of judicial restraint…

With the Old Breed

Editor’s note: This essay was originally posted on Memorial Day 2013. I've been reading With the Old Breed, Eugene Sledge's classic…

From the Blog

Mike Rappaport
University of San Diego School of Law

Trump’s Supreme Court Deal

As many know, Donald Trump has released a list of 11 people he might nominate…

Airport Screening: TSA Versus Private Security Firms

With lines at airports now approaching absurd lengths, a movement is arising for employing private…

Michael McConnell on the Ninth Amendment

One of the puzzles in constitutional law has been the original meaning of the Ninth…

John O. McGinnis
Northwestern University School of Law

Judicial Restraint is a Question of Constitutional Interpretation

 Greg Weiner and Evan Bernick have been conducting an interesting debate in this blog about…

The Classical Liberal Case Against Brexit

Britain votes on whether to leave the European Union in a month. If I were…

Trump, Clinton, and the Supreme Court

There are many reasons for classical liberals to oppose Donald Trump in the general election,…

Michael S. Greve
George Mason University Law School

Blessed Memorial Day

Uwe E. Reinhardt is a celebrity prof (economics and public affairs) at Princeton. I’ve never…

Odd Legal Ethics

In an order that the Volokh Conspiracy’s Orin Kerr has described as “puzzling,” U.S. District…

The President’s Power to Spend

In House of Representatives v. Burwell, yet another big case arising over the Affordable Care…

Liberty Law Forum

Clinton_prwora

Twenty Years after Welfare Reform: The Welfare System Remains in Place

It was 20 years ago that leaders of both major political parties gathered in the Rose Garden of the White House to watch President Clinton sign the Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act. The bill that Clinton signed into law on August 22, 1996, despite its obscure title (and unpronounceable acronym, PRWORA—hereafter we will…

Read More

Responses

Welfare Reform’s Success and the War on Immobility

There is much with which to agree in Michael Tanner’s Liberty Forum essay summarizing the post-1996 history of welfare reform, its successes and failures, and where to go from here. However, I view the Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act as having succeeded to a greater extent than Tanner believes. Indeed, as I have argued…

Read More

Tailoring the Help to Those Who Need It

Michael Tanner’s Liberty Forum essay provides a characteristically insightful and level-headed overview of the 1996 welfare reform and its consequences. He admirably clears away the rhetorical fog that still envelopes our debates regarding welfare, and does not let either side get away with much. “Welfare reform was neither the disaster that its critics feared nor…

Read More

We Can’t Stand Welfare, and Can’t Stand Welfare Reform

The 1996 welfare reform law seemed, at the time, like a very big deal. Critics denounced it as a savage assault on those Americans whose lives were already precarious. Supporters hailed it as the first reversal since 1932 of a relentless trend: individual government welfare programs grew more numerous, while each one spent more money…

Read More

Twenty Years after Welfare Reform: Michael Tanner’s Response

Scott Winship, Yuval Levin, and William Voegeli offer insightful critiques of my Liberty Forum essay on the 20th anniversary of welfare reform. Actually, I use the term “critique” advisedly, because there may not actually be that much daylight between our positions. Still, there are quibbles, if not major differences. Scott Winship clearly feels the 1996 reform…

Read More