Free Markets, Racial Equality, and Southern Prosperity: The Rise and Fall of Lewis Harvie Blair

Lewis Harvie Blair remains one of the most curious and frustrating figures of post-Reconstruction Virginia. Blair, called by historian Charles E. Wynes one of the forgotten voices of opposition to segregation, distinguished himself by exposing the failure of “New South” industrial development and illustrating the economic benefits of racial integration. The Richmond businessman and writer…

The Emptiness of Empathetic Judging

Dahlia Lithwick has recently complained that the Supreme Court is made up of elites. Hers is not the usual complaint…

Life, Death, and the New Orthodoxy

In a village in South Wales, 34-year-old Matthew Williams was recently stunned by a taser discharged by a policewoman. He…

From the Blog

Mike Rappaport
University of San Diego School of Law

Frozen: Politics in Disney Movies

I like to keep up with various types of popular entertainment.  So while I don’t…

Another Argument for Originalism

In the past, I have noted that there are three main arguments for originalism: 1.…

More on the Consequences of a Supreme Court Decision in the Obamacare Case

In my last post, I wrote about the consequences if Obamacare loses in the Supreme…

John O. McGinnis
Northwestern University School of Law

The Emptiness of Empathetic Judging

Dahlia Lithwick has recently complained that the Supreme Court is made up of elites. Hers…

Three Reasons to Reform Old Age Entitlements Now

In my last post, I showed that the younger generation is likely to live longer in…

To Be Young Is Very Heaven

Last Friday I had the great pleasure of participating in a panel at the Federalist…

Michael S. Greve
George Mason School of Law

How to Avoid Argentine Federalism

James L. Buckley is a former U.S. Senator, federal judge, and real-life saint. The Federalist…

D.I.G. King v. Burwell?

The hubbub over the ACA is getting weirder and weirder. Amidst other revelations, there appears…

And the Wall Fell

Yesterday, GMU Law School celebrated the 25th Anniversary of the fall of the Berlin Wall—quite…

Liberty Law Forum

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Competency in Administration: James Q. Wilson and American Bureaucracy

Ever since the reelection of President Obama, bureaucrats have been behaving badly. Conservatives may have steeled themselves to expect bad performance from bureaucrats at all times; but even fans of federal authority should be concerned about recent bungling and abuses. The Affordable Care Act (“Obamacare”) required millions of Americans to sign up for health-insurance policies, but…

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Responses

How to Make the Bureaucracy More Accountable

Jeremy Rabkin has written a fine essay about the continuing relevance of James Q. Wilson’s 1989 book Bureaucracy: What Government Agencies Do and Why They Do It. I have been fortunate enough to benefit from Wilson’s analysis in my own writing on the Justice Department’s Office of the Solicitor General. His framework showed why the…

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Bureaucracy and Some Bureaucracy Problems

It’s Bureaucracy’s twenty-fifth birthday. To celebrate, let’s state some basic facts that correspond with James Q. Wilson’s thinking. Americans want a lot from their government. We want more than we’ve wanted before. It doesn’t ultimately matter where these desires come from (rising standards of living? the inner logic of democracy? interest groups? politicians?). What matters…

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When They’re Too Good at Their Job . . .

The 25th anniversary of James Q. Wilson’s Bureaucracy: What Government Agencies Do and Why They Do It marks an appropriate occasion to reflect on the contributions of this work to our understanding of bureaucratic behavior and performance, and the extensive—and, at least in some areas, growing—presence of the administrative state in the lives of American…

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