Mark Pulliam

Mark Pulliam is a contributing editor of Law and Liberty.

History’s Fickle Judgment

herbert hoover

Why is Herbert Hoover so reviled?

How should history rate Herbert Hoover, the nation’s 31st President? By today’s standards, Hoover was an anomaly. He rose, in Horatio Alger fashion, from being orphaned at age nine to the pinnacle of self-made success in business and finance. Although he was a Quaker, Hoover’s martial adventures in China’s Boxer Rebellion in 1900—at one point leading a detachment of U.S. Marines against Chinese rebels—rival the fictional exploits of Indiana Jones. In an era before ghost writers, Hoover was an accomplished author; his 1922 book, American Individualism, cemented the fame he had earned as a global mining engineer and international humanitarian relief administrator.

Read More

Prospects for Constitutionalism

The Assembly Room in Independence Hall

What are the prospects for constitutionalism and the rule of law under President Donald Trump? 

Read More

Looking at Trump from Outside the Bubble

Donald Trump Hotel Letter T Luggage Cart Wagon Closeup Detail No

Everyone seems to be sharing their reflections on the election of Donald Trump as President (for example, here, here, and here), prompting me to weigh in with some of my own.

Read More

The Decline of Self-Rule

public sector unions

The signs are all around us that the government envisioned by the Framers—self-rule by the people—is on the decline.

Read More

A Lawless Labor Agenda

dept of labor

In prior posts (here and here), I looked at the pro-union agenda of the Obama administration’s National Labor Relations Board, and the anti-employer policies undertaken by the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, Occupational Safety and Health Administration, and Department of Labor. The leadership of the Department by Thomas Perez deserves a closer look, for Secretary Perez has brazenly promoted the objectives of organized labor at the expense of the rule of law.

Read More

Obama’s Nanny State for Employers

poppins

Obama’s employment law agenda consists of laying siege to employers’ management rights.

Read More

Labor Pains

nlrb

When thinking about the National Labor Relations Board under President Obama, most observers recall the 2014 decision in NLRB v. Noel Canning, in which the U.S. Supreme Court unanimously ruled that Obama’s kangaroo-court “recess appointments”—made when the Senate was not actually in recess—were invalid.

Noel Canning was a huge setback for the administration, requiring the NLRB to reconsider 700 decisions rendered during the period in which it lacked a legitimate quorum.

Few have noticed, however, that the Board has not altered its course since that defeat.

Read More

Don’t Thread on Me

The Texas Supreme Court’s 2015 decision in Patel v. Texas Department of Licensing and Regulation, striking down a state law requiring at least 750 hours of training in order to perform commercial “eyebrow threading”—a form of hair removal mainly performed in South Asian and Middle Eastern communities—has generated substantial notoriety for the court and for the Institute for Justice, which brought the lawsuit challenging the law.

Read More

The Beguiling Myth of “Mass Incarceration”

prison-break-7

It is not surprising that those at opposite poles of the ideological spectrum generally view public policy issues—and proposed solutions—differently. What is surprising is when conservatives adopt the rhetoric of the Left (along with the accompanying narratives, memes, and canards) regarding a subject as important as criminal justice.

Read More