John Locke

The Problem of Military Intervention

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Just and Unjust Military Intervention

Much of American military and diplomatic history can be told in terms of military intervention and counter intervention, as well as debates about the justice and prudence of using force this way. One of the fundamental purposes of the American

The Declaration’s Grievances and the Constitution

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In a detailed historical review of Timothy Sandefur’s new book entitled The Conscience of the Constitution, Adam Tate raises the practice of federalism as a principled method that representatives used in the early republic for handling difficult issues. Rather

The Conservative Mind at 60: Russell Kirk’s Unwritten Constitutionalism

The Conservative Mind at 60: Russell Kirk’s Unwritten Constitutionalism

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In his great work, The American Republic, written in 1866, the American Catholic political writer Orestes Brownson – who ranks with Calhoun and John Adams as among the finest political minds America has produced, and who still remains somewhat

Responses

Debating the Terms of the American Founding

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Natural Rights Individualism

Eleven insightful contemporary scholars of American political thought create a dialogue concerning the natural rights origins of America and its Progressive transformation.   The first five essays (Thomas West, Paul Rahe, Craig Yirush, Bradley Thompson, and Eric Mack) deal with

Alexander Hamilton: A Martyr for Liberty?

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Alexander Hamilton

Eight days after his notorious June 18 speech at the Constitutional Convention where he recommended an executive and senate to serve during good behavior, potentially for life, Alexander Hamilton rose to make some general comments about what was at stake