Are You My Constitutional Law?

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One of the questions I had when I became a professor of law was “What does it mean to profess law?” Another: “What law is it that I am to profess?”

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The Falsifiable Justice Kennedy

Kennedy

The Green Bag’s most recent Micro-Symposium is worth checking out.

My favorite piece is Jonathan Mermin’s “On the Importance of Headings and Subheadings in Judicial Opinions.” It exhibits the mixture of whimsy, substance, and law-nerdiness characteristic of great Green Bag writing.

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Scalia’s Successor Needs His Virtues

In addition to a commitment to enforcing the Constitution as written, the successor to Justice Antonin Scalia should possess two of his virtues.  First, he or she must unflinching in pursuit of principle even in the face of the rewards that often come from abandoning it.  The highest honors from our legal and academic establishment all go to justices who begin or  drift left. Justice Scalia, of course, was impervious to all such temptations.

But a justice also faces a temptation to decide law in favor of the policy preferences of the team who nominated him. Law, however, has no team, and Justice Scalia knew it. He wrote opinions in cases from flag burning to detention of enemy combatants that conflicted with the sentiments of many of his fellow conservatives.

And it was clear from the time  of his appointment that on the Court Scalia would be a member of only one party—the party of law.  In the academy, he showed his independence by dissenting on issues of central importance to his colleagues, like affirmative action.  At the Office of Legal Counsel in the Ford Admnistration, however, he even made allies unhappy by keeping the executive branch within the metes and bounds of the law.

Second, Scalia’s successor must be capable of pressing the intellectual case for following the Constitution as written.

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Trump, the Supreme Court, and the Dog that Won’t Bark (at Least Not for a While)

Courthouse Building

Despite President Obama having the opportunity to remake the U.S. Supreme Court with one nominee, Donald Trump will need to wait for the same opportunity. Not because Congress will confirm Judge Garland, and not because Congress won’t confirm Trump’s nominee, but because of the ideological configuration of the Court, and where Justice Scalia fell in that current configuration in relation to the other justices.

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Removal of the Director of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau

Recently, a three judge panel on the D.C. Circuit held in PHH Corp. v. Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, that the for cause removal provision for the director of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau was unconstitutional. Rather than striking down the entire statute, the court struck the for cause removal provision, leaving the director subject to removal at the pleasure of the President.

The Bureau is an example of the newest philosophy in administrative governance, which the Democrats have pursued in Sarbanes Oxley, Obamacare, and the Dodd-Frank banking act. The idea is to maximize the independence of administrative agencies and to enhance their power. In terms of maximizing the independence of the Bureau, the Bureau does not answer to the President (that is what the for cause removal provision means) and it is funded through the Federal Reserve, so that the Congress cannot use its appropriations power to control the agency. The power of the agency is enhanced, because it is controlled by a single director rather than a bipartisan commission as virtually all independent agencies are. Needless to say, this new philosophy of governance is extremely problematic.

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The Original Understanding of Substantive Due Process

Justice Collage

The modern conservative legal movement grew up in response to the Warren Court’s activism in the 1960s. In opposing the decisions of Justice Brennan and the rest, conservatives made use of the same arguments that liberals had used during the New Deal, when the Supreme Court had a conservative majority resistant to the Roosevelt program. In essence, the conservatives during the Warren years called liberals hypocrites for not deferring to the legislature, since deference was the claimed reason for the 1937 overturning of Lochner v. New York (1905). When the conservatives finally did get a majority on the Court in the 1980s, it was under a Republican president, and deference to the Reagan administration made a lot of sense for conservatives.

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Why a Republican Senate Would Be Best for the Rule of Law

There has been a lot of discussion in the blogosphere about what candidate would be better for the rule of law—Hillary Clinton or Donald Trump. At City Journal I recently pointed out that both candidates pose some legal dangers.

But whoever is elected President, there can be no doubt that a Republican Senate would be best for originalism and thus the long-term prospects of the rule of rule. Begin with the election of Clinton, because that is the far more probable outcome and thus should be counted most heavily in the calculus.  She would nominate justices who are outright hostile to the meaning of the Constitution.  At the Presidential debate she said nothing about wanting justices who would follow the law, just judges who have empathy and who would follow her litmus tests of being in favor of Roe and against Citizens United. That latter comments were too much even for the Washington Post.

Even more importantly, she comes from a progressive movement that is dedicated to transforming the Constitution without going through the amendment process. As I said in my City Journal essay:

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Justice Scalia and Congress’s Power to Regulate Immigration

In a recent post, I noted that Justice Scalia has been criticized for departing from originalism in various areas.  But the positions that Justice Scalia took in many of these cases – including a prohibition on state affirmative action, limitations on regulatory takings, and protection of various state immunities, such as sovereign immunity and commandeering immunity – could have been defended on originalist grounds.  One area, however, where there is little to be said for Justice Scalia’s position has largely been ignored: the federal government’s power over immigration. In Arizona v. United States, Justice Scalia started strong, initially questioning the federal…

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The Constitutional Work Before Us

Capitol Dome with Dark Storm Sky

The Supreme Court is lost. Sunday night’s debate settled that. The question now is not how to save the Court but rather how to navigate an adverse one, and the answer is to deprive it of power.

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Eighth Annual Originalism Works-in-Progress Conference

The University of San Diego's Center for the Study of Constitutional Originalism has announced the papers and commentators for the Eighth Annual Hugh and Hazel Darling Foundation Originalism Works-in-Progress Conference scheduled for February 17-18, 2017 at the University of San Diego Law School.   They are: Randy Barnett (Georgetown) & Evan Bernick (Institute for Justice), The Letter and the Spirit: A Theory of Good Faith Constitutional Construction. Commentator: John McGinnis (Northwestern) Will Baude (Chicago), Constitutional Liquidation Commentator: Bernadette Meyler (Stanford) Mitch Berman (University of Pennsylvania), Our Principled Constitution Commentator: Stephen Sachs (Duke) Jud Campbell (Richmond), Natural Rights and the First Amendment Commentator: Fred Schauer (Virginia) James Fox (Stetson), Black Originalism:…

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