Publius

Publius and the NSA Surveillance Program

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Editor’s Note: This is the first of two posts that will offer contrasting opinions on the NSA electronic surveillance programs. Angelo Codevilla’s essay will appear tomorrow.

On July 24th, 2013, the United States House of Representatives defeated an amendment to

Does America Need a New ‘Science of Politics’?

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Professor Buckley argues in “American Exceptionalism” that presidents cause countries with the office to realize less freedom on average than countries with prime ministers. Below I explain why neither Buckley’s theoretical claims nor the empirical evidence he provides persuades me

Restoring the Deliberate Sense of the Community

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A friend from high school, distressed by the results of Tuesday’s balloting, circulated a prayerful plea that President Obama’s re-election indicates “our nation is in a sinful state” whose consequences we must “suffer” until we repent our “wicked ways.”

This

Constitutional Moments

Constitutional Moments

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This lengthy essay is adapted from a “Constitution Day” talk delivered at several universities over the past month. It attempts to understand the country’s current predicament in light of the Founder’s “constitutional moment.” Our problems are neither a matter of

Responses

James Madison’s Constitutionalism

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In this next edition of Liberty Law Talk, I discuss with Gregory Weiner, author of Madison’s Metronome: The Constitution, Majority Rule, and the Tempo of American PoliticsJames Madison’s understanding of how popular sovereignty, federalism, and separation of powers

Calvin Coolidge: A President Born on the Fourth of July

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Coming after the first progressive wave of Theodore Roosevelt and Woodrow Wilson, Calvin Coolidge’s White House tenure boldly challenged their expansive ideas about executive power specifically and federal power generally.  Coolidge’s presidency was marked by an understanding of the power

Who is to say Nay to the People? Publius, Majority Rule, and Willmoore Kendall

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The Enduring Importance of Willmoore Kendall

Once upon a time in America, conservatives celebrated Congress as the last best hope to preserve the authentic traditions of republican government.  As recently as the 1960s, it was “conservative” to look to the

Hadley Arkes’ response to Michael Ramsey’s review of Constitutional Illusions & Anchoring Truths

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I’m quite grateful to Michael Ramsey for his engagement with the arguments in my book, Constitutional Illusions & Anchoring Truths: The Touchstone of the Natural Law.  I appreciate, of course, his praise of the parts that alone, he says,